humble roots

To reclaim humility, Jesus embraced human limits as good. To restore our humanity, Jesus revealed the goodness of being bound in space and time. To free us from shame, Jesus proved that being human is nothing to be ashamed of. (page 88)

But it is precisely the fact that our resources do not belong to us–that they have been given to us by our good, kind Master–that frees us to take risks. When everything is a gift and when we learn to trust the Giver of those gifts, we learn a kind of humility that makes us fearless and productive. And instead of either hoarding or rejecting our resources, we cultivate them. Instead of burying them, we plant them. (page 148)

When you recognize that¬†you love something are gifted to do it, you must also immediately recognize that you do not love everything, and you are not gifted to do everything. Suddenly you realize your own limitations; desire humbles you. And suddenly you are free form the tyranny of “keeping your options open.” You are free from the responsibility of feeling like you have to “do it all.” You are free to do only what you have been made to do. (page 162)

The humble person doesn’t deny the pain of this world, or her complicity in it, but she does hope. She continues to forage for the¬†sweetness that God has promised. She gleans where she has not planted. Along the fence rows and roadsides. Not in carefully cultivated thickets, but in the wildness of the waysides. Our hands may be scratched and bleeding, we may stink of sweat, our feet sinking in the mud, but there, just within our grasp, is a cluster of hope–a reminder of who God is and he never fails His children. (page 188)

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Oh, this book was so good and so necessary for me this summer when I’ve bumped up against my limits as a wife, a mother, a friend again and again and needed the reminder that limitations are a grace. They guide us, they reveal the truth of our dependency to us day after day. They also remind me to stop in this place right now, with all its difficulties, and plant. None of our sweetness has grown where we cultivated it but I’m starting to see mercies in the “wildness of the waysides.” And that is sweet indeed.

All quotes from Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul by Hannah Anderson

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